Printing Information

The Salt Print

The Salt Print is the oldest photographic printing process and was developed by William Henry Fox-Talbot in the1830s. Some early practitioners were Hill and Adamson from Edinburgh, the Englishman Roger Fenton and the Frenchmen Nadar and Edouard Baldus. Despite the plethora of printing methods developed since, it is still practised by photographers who enjoy the process and craft of printmaking. Salt printing is of course an analogue printing  process and needs a negative to make the print from. In the 19th Century the negative from the camera was held in contact with the printing paper in a frame and exposed to sunlight. Today the negative can be created digitally so allowing  us to make a genuine hand crafted Salt Print from any original. To make a Salt Print a piece of high quality, pure cotton paper is hand coated with a salt solution, allowed to dry, then recoated with silver nitrate. Once dried again a negative the same size as the finished print is held against the paper and exposed under an Ultra Violet light source. After processing we have an exquisite, warm toned print that will last for many hundreds of years. Unlike contemporary printing methods the Salt Print image is embedded in the fibres of the paper not in a surface coating. This gives it a velvety almost 3D appearance.

L'Esperance. Built in the 19th Century for the Earl of Dunraven, L'Esperance is now a houseboat at West Mersea in Essex.

L’Esperance. Built in the 19th Century for the Earl of Dunraven, L’Esperance is now a houseboat at West Mersea in Essex.

Detail of the negative used to make the above Salt Print

Detail of the negative used to make the above Salt Print

Platinum/Palladium Print

The ultimate photographic printing process. The paper is hand coated and contact printed. Prints made using this method display more tones than any other analogue process and are truly archival. They will literally last as long as the paper they are printed on. They are sometimes printed showing the brush marks in the border. Otherwise these marks are masked out creating a straight edge. If you would like to learn more about the process click here.

 

 

 

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